jump to navigation

Knowledge Management Updated February 1, 2013

Posted by stewsutton in business analytics, business intelligence, Collaboration, Communications, Knowledge Management, Software.
Tags: , , , ,
add a comment

Knowledge Management has undergone a significant change of emphasis over the past several years. We have moved beyond the days when KM was centered in the design and deployment of content management solutions, the fanfare around launching communities of practice, and the practical benefits of sharing lessons learned. The emphasis today is a complete reformulation of how we can extract value from information. The new intersecting themes generally include “big data”, “business analytics / business intelligence”, “social”, and “mobility”.

Leading up to this new arrangement of priorities, KM bounced around in the past several years seeking to find itself as the rapid technology changes in mobile platforms and across consumer-based social platforms took center stage. This caused the KM emphasis to drift toward “collaboration” things – after all isn’t sharing knowledge through collaboration what its all about? Community models for knowledge stewardship have fallen out of favor while crowdsourcing of answers has increase in popularity. The practical difficulty is that running a business, engineering improvements to complex operational procedures, and designing and manufacturing of precision equipment cannot be directly guided by the wisdom of any crowd.

And while the phrase knowledge management has often been met with resistance “I don’t what someone managing my knowledge…”, the new KM emphasis has oriented itself to offering value to the business and to the individual creators and managers of knowledge across the workforce. Consider for a moment this simple ten-step framework that illustrates the intersecting themes of knowledge and information management today…

1. Identify a relevant “structured” data source associated with our business
2. Repeat #1 multiple times, not really knowing (just yet) the intersecting relevance
3. Prepare the data sources identified in #2 so that they may be “accessed” and integrated
4. Connect results of #3 by using software to analyze and discover “features” in the data
5. Overlay social graphs, geo-mapping, and other information sources to illuminate findings
6. Clarify and contextualize these findings, draw conclusions, and propose business changes
7. Implement business changes and monitor #5 to assess the impact of business changes
8. Make necessary adjustments based on #7, and return to #1 to discover more relationships

Using tablet-based computers will expand the scope and impact of business intelligence throughout business.

Using tablet-based dashboards will expand the scope and impact of business intelligence and business analytics for both strategic and tactical value

Knowledge Management is becoming a more refined and mature information science. The tools for business are enabling broad and sophisticated analysis of data and application of business analytics by individuals that have line-of-business accountability. From middle management to executives, a new landscape of configurable mobile dashboards that encourage experimentation and insight building are emerging quickly. Big data is being gathered everywhere. The interface methods are being dramatically simplified. And mobile (tablet based) interfaces are being quickly formed, refined, delivered, modified, and shared among co-workers at various levels. Knowledge workers today are more skilled within business intelligence and business analytics.

It is a very interesting time.

Tablets in the Classroom December 10, 2012

Posted by stewsutton in Education, Information Technology, Learning.
Tags: , , , , , , , , ,
add a comment

The Center for Digital Education estimated education spending on IT reached $19.7 billion in 2010-11 and it’s expected to rise again in 2011-12. Despite school budget cuts, officials are spending more money on tech than ever before. Traditional educational publishers are devoting more attention and budget to the digital world. Project Tomorrow reports that 27 percent of middle school and 35 percent of high school students use digital textbooks. On top of that, the Pearson Foundation reports that 58 percent of college students prefer a digital format for textbooks. Tablets and e-readers are the ideal windows for that content. In McAllen, Texas, public school officials have opted for iPads over desktop PCs and plan to distribute 25,000 iPads over the next few years. The total spend of $20 million in the McAllen district covers the cost of the iPads and also the Wi-Fi network and training needed to support their use. The program includes iPads for third grade and upwards and iPods for pre-kindergarten up to second grade. San Diego distributed 26,000 iPads to students this year and Chicago public schools have around 20,000 iPads. Are tablets really the answer for education? Possibly so, but the truth is that touch devices are so popular right now that they’re being touted as the answer to everything. A few years back, before tablets burst onto the scene, there was a push to equip students with netbooks, but it was met with mixed results. Having an entire school filled with tablet-equipped students has obvious benefits, but cost and device management are serious hurdles to overcome.

Technology Trends June 2009 June 26, 2009

Posted by stewsutton in Information Technology.
Tags: , , ,
add a comment

There are some technology trends that are happening so quickly that it is becoming increasingly difficult to map an organizational strategy to capitalize on continuous variation without sacrificing some performance toward  organizational targets.

Consider the following arenas where technology is accelerating quickly:

  1. The cell phone has become a handheld computer that just happens to make phone calls as one of its core functions
  2. This is giving rise to rapid growth in mobile computing – but not the sort of computing you might imagine on a PC with a tiny screen – an integration of services fro the “cloud” is stitched together under the innovative interface of the mobile platform
  3. Cloud computing and social software services are going hand-in-hand to establish and refine the next-generation information channels.  Will we be using Twitter in a couple of years?  Time will tell.  The ability to follow many individuals and broadcast “social status updates” to hundreds and thousands of “followers” with a simple email message is an example of the “new-gen info tech meeting with the legacy information technology.
  4. Hardware device innovation and design-to-market cycles are shrinking to under one year for sophisticated information technology systems – especially consumer-based information technology products.
  5. Another parallel innovation and rapid product cycle innovation is the service focus of the current advanced mobile platform offerings.  Smartphones are not currently selected by consumers based entirely on the technical specifications of the phone, but rather the quality of service integration.  Specifically for today that emphasis is directed toward the social software stack integraiton.